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ISTANBUL’DAN: Design To Oppose Cultural Shifts

ISTANBUL’DAN: Design To Oppose Cultural Shifts

With the state of current affairs, the designers of the collective ISTANBUL’DAN wanted to oppose hostility and xenophobia through artistic ways. They banded together to create products that are more than just products— they are also stories. Headed to the historic Sishane and Galata neighborhoods of Istanbul, the designers worked together with local artisans and makers to interpret the history of the city through design. They work in a tightly woven group to create objects, not letting any cultural or linguistic barriers stop them. Together, they act as messengers between opposing cultures to pay homage to Istanbul.

Designer Jonathan Radetz created AYNA, which is a set of atypical mirrors. Rather than accurately reflecting what’s in front of them, they distort or multiply the object, reminding us that it’s important to consciously widen your perspective and have multiple points of views.

SEPET, by Florian Saul, is a delicate bowl-like object that combined the art of lamp making and the topic of fishing which is essential to the Bosphorus region. It’s shape is reminiscent of a flexible fishing net, and molds to fit whatever is put in it.

CALYX is a table lamp by Dorothee Mainka, which was inspired by old school oil lamps. It has a translucent metal mesh that forms the shade, which creates unique shadows when the lamp is on.

Michael Konstantin Wolke pays homage to excess with COK, a collection of lamps that create eye-catching clashes of shapes and multiple possibilities. It celebrates the everyday materials found in local makers’ workshops in Sishane.

Simple yet very playful, MUM by Pierre Kracht is a candle holder that was shaped under pressure of simple metal tubes. It creates a fun contrast between technical details and organic free will. He also created HACI YATMAZ (below),  another series of luminaires that celebrate an optimistic outlook on life. It has a heavy weight in the bottom of its “belly”, that helps the light to stay upright despite all the all the knocks it might receive.

Laura Jungmann worked with metal spinner Fatih Dogan to experiment with the art of metal spinning. Combining modern technology like laser cutting and traditional spinning techniques, they were able to create truly unique shapes.

Photography: Tamara Eda Temucin


via Design MilkDesign Milk